Attractions

Haunted Locations in the Philippines

Written by Patrick

Are you ready to confront the spirits, unravel the mysteries, and explore the haunted locations in the Philippines? 

Amidst the white sand beaches, lush mountain ranges, and intriguing landforms, the Philippines has several haunted locations as well.  It could be an abandoned house or hotel, unfinished building, makeshift hospital during World War II, or simply a spot where a centuries-old tree stands.

If you are looking for a thrilling halloween activity or want to make your vacation in the Philippines more exciting, try exploring any of these top haunted locations.

Diplomat Hotel

Diplomat Hotel

Caption: Diplomat Hotel | Image Source

Standing on top of the Dominican Hill in Baguio City is the abandoned Diplomat Hotel.  Constructed to be used as a vacation house for the Dominican friars, the structure was also used as a refuge of the people during World War II.  Unfortunately, it was invaded by the Japanese who then turned it into their headquarters where barbaric acts were done to those they captured.

After the war, the building was acquired by Diplomat Hotels, Inc. but operations ceased and was abandoned in 1987 following the death of the owner.  Currently, the building is used as Baguio City’s art center and has hosted art exhibits and installations.  It is also a venue for photo shoots, film making, wedding receptions and other events.

Soldiers and headless nuns as well as screaming, crying, and moaning are reportedly seen and heard in the vicinity.  It was even on TV programs including Magandang Gabi, Bayan (Halloween Special) and Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho (Halloween Special).

Manila Film Center

Manila Film Center

Caption: Manila Film Center | Image Source

Spearheaded by former first lady Imelda Marcos, the construction of the film center started in 1981.  During the construction, more than 150 workers were said to be buried under the quick-drying wet cement when the scaffolding collapsed.  Rescuers were only permitted to get inside the accident site nine hours after the collapse and officials under the Marcos dictatorship said that there were only seven casualties.

Believers claim that the building is haunted due to the accident that took the lives of several workers.  The building was once featured in TV programs including Magandang Gabi, Bayan (Halloween Special) and i-Witness as well as movies and novels.

Balete Drive

Balete Drive

Caption: Balete Drive | Image Source

This street in Quezon City got its name from the balete tree that used to line the street and darken the area.  Balete trees, in Philippine folklore, are believed to be inhabited by spirits and mysterious creatures.  Various stories have been circulating that the area is haunted by a white lady, a ghost of a girl who was killed and buried under the balete tree.

Teacher’s Camp

Teacher's Camp

Caption: Teacher’s Camp | Image Source

Located along Leonard Wood Road, the Baguio Teacher’s Camp (BTC), or simply Teacher’s Camp, was established as a training center and vacation site for teachers and employees of the Insular government during the early 1900s.  It was used as a hospital by the Japanese forces from 1942 to 1945 and later on by the Pangasinan Police Academy in 1971.  Currently, Teacher’s Camp is being used as a venue for religious retreats, sporting events, and other gatherings.

The land, where the camp was built, was occupied by Igorots and that a battle took place in this place many years ago.  One of the ghosts reportedly seen is known as the Love Sick Igorot as it is said to follow women around the camp.  Sightings of a white lady and headless priest have been reported as well.

Clark Air Base Hospital

Clark Air Base Hospital

Caption: Clark Air Base Hospital | Image Source

Used during the World War II and Vietnam War, this abandoned hospital was featured in the National Geographic’s I Wouldn’t Go In There and was featured by the Ghost Hunters International in 2017.  Often heard in the abandoned hospital are whispers, mysterious voices, and screams for help.  Some even experienced having things thrown at them from nowhere.

Laperal White House

Laperal White House

Caption: Laperal White House | Image Source

Also called Laperal Guesthouse, Laperal White House was built by Roberto and Victorino Laperal to be used as their vacation home.  It was purchased by billionaire Lucio Tan in 2007, had it renovated, and made it into a tourist attraction.  It currently houses a restaurant.

People claim to have heard noises and voices even if the house is empty.  Some even see a little girl standing in front of the house.

Corregidor Island

Corregidor Island

Caption: Ruins on Corregidor Island

Corregidor Island, a popular travel destination in the Philippines, served as harbor defense of Manila Bay and Manila during World War II.  Aside from memorials dedicated to those who lost their lives during the war, the original structures of Malinta Tunnel and mile-long barracks as well as old guns and mortars can still be seen on the island up to this day.

Corregidor welcomes tourists everyday and some have reported sightings of ghosts of soldiers whose lives perished while defending the country.

These locations are associated with various ghostly legends and stories, but whether or not you believe in the supernatural, they hold an undeniable fascination for those interested in the paranormal and the rich history of the Philippines. If you plan to visit any of these haunted locations in the Philippines, be respectful and take local beliefs and traditions into consideration.

READ MORE: Filipino Halloween Traditions

About the Author

Patrick

Patrick is an entrepreneur, digital nomad, explorer, and photographer. Patrick is always in search of fun and adventure. He is well travelled throughout the world, and although location independent, his home base is Phoenix, Arizona in the USA. Patrick loves island lifestyle which is no wonder why he is so interested in spending time in the Philippines with it’s over 7,000 islands. Patrick created this site to share his knowledge of and experiences in the Philippines with Filipinos as well as other foreigners.

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